An Orthodox Jewish School has taken a hard stance against the anti-vaxxers who refuse to vaccinate their children.

YWN has confirmed that the Visnitz Monsey Girls School made the bold announcement on Thursday afternoon. The decision was made after 2 childen were confirmed to have Measles. One child is in preschool and one in elementary school.

Any child who is not immunized, can’t return to school for 21 days. No “religious exemption” is accepted. A religious exemption does not work when there is a measles outbreak.

If the school identifies another measles case, the 21 days will start over.

On Wednesday, YWN published a story about a measles outbreak in New York, with 6 residents of Williamsburg and seven residents of Rockland County confirmed to have the disease. An additional eight suspected cases in Rockland County were being investigated involving a mix of adults and children. Many are linked to recent travel to Israel which has been dealing with the disease for months.

Two weeks ago, YWN reported about the Menahel of Breslov Mosdos in Tzefas having been infected with the measles. He was listed in critical condition at the time of the news story.

There have been dozens of stories published by YWN in the past few months of measles alerts issued by authorities involving Frum people who have not been vaccinated.

Health officials have said anyone at the following locations in Rockland, Westchester and Bergen counties may have been exposed to the measles:

  • Congregation Bais Elazer in Monsey, N.Y. on Oct. 4
  • Mia’s Reflexology in New City, N.Y. on Oct. 4
  • Lifetime Gym in Montvale, N.J. on Oct. 5
  • Wesley Kosher in Monsey N.Y. on Oct. 5
  • Congregation Borov in Monsey, N.Y. on Oct. 5 and Oct. 6
  • Costco in Nanuet, N.Y. on Oct. 7
  • Care 365 in Monsey, N.Y. on Oct. 8
  • Westchester Medical Center’s Emergency Room in Valhalla, N.Y. on Oct. 11

Lack of immunizations have been blamed for outbreaks within other Orthodox Jewish communities. In 2013, the largest measles outbreak in the United States in 17 years spread through Orthodox families in two Brooklyn neighborhoods.

For those who believe they may have been exposed and have further questions, a toll-free hotline has been established: 1-888-364-4837. The hotline is available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Measles is highly contagious, so anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of getting the disease.

People who are unvaccinated risk getting infected with measles and spreading it to others, and they may spread measles to people who cannot get vaccinated because they are too young or have specific health conditions.

Individuals are considered protected or immune to measles if:

• they were born before 1957

• have received two doses of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine

• have had measles confirmed by a health care provider

• or have a lab test confirming immunity

Symptoms include a fever, rash, cough, conjunctivitis or runny nose, and they could appear 10 to 12 days after exposure.

The virus can remain in the air or on surfaces for up to two hours.

To prevent the spread of illness, health officials are advising individuals who may have been exposed and who have symptoms consistent with measles to contact their health care provider, a local clinic, or a local emergency department before going for care.

(Charles Gross – YWN)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *